Official Association of Britain’s Brigade of Gurkhas

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Gurkha Photography Competition 2019

This year the Brigade of Gurkhas will run a Photography Competition open to all serving members of the Brigade of Gurkhas and Gurkha Veterans. 

There will be a prize for the best image and this will be presented by the Colonel Commandant Brigade of Gurkhas. The winning image will also feature in an edition of Parbate in 2019.

The best images will also feature on our various websites and social media channels to enhance the brand of the Brigade of Gurkhas.

If you are a professional photographer in your own right you are not allowed to enter and any entries made from such parties will be removed from the competition. HQBG reserves the right to disallow any entries or persons submitting entries. 

So please submit your entries (up to 3 per person) and application form to: rhq3parbate@gmail.com no later than 31st May 2019.

 

GURKHA AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION 2019 ENTRY GUIDELINES

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the first Brigade of Gurkhas Photographic Competition aimed at serving personnel and veterans of the Brigade of Gurkhas. Closing date for entries is 31st May 19. Below is a simple criteria and application form for submissions.

OVERVIEW

In order to take part, you must be a serving member of the Brigade of Gurkhas or Gurkha veteran at the time the application process ends on 31st May 19.

Any person or image that does not fulfil the criteria will be ignored. Personal submission details must be correct, or the entry will be ignored. All entries must be by email to rhq3parbate@gmail.com

We will not respond to email entries unless necessary.

You will be informed by email if you were in the top 6. The Winner will receive a prize.

HQBG will not be liable for any costs of capturing and sending the images.

IMAGE SIZE

The file size must be at least 3MB. Set your device to capture at its maximum resolution. If unsure look up how to do this online for your chosen device.

DEVICE USED FOR IMAGE CAPTURE

Images can be captured on any device as long as the minimum image size of 3MB can be met.

TIMEFRAME OF IMAGES

As this is the first Gurkha Photographic Competition, the images must have been taken in a period from Jan 2018 up to the date you send them in. This office can recognise images that are taken outside this timeframe from the metadata attached to any image.

IMAGE COMPOSITION

Top tip: We are looking for people focused images that will enhance the Gurkha Brand should the images be used by Headquarters Brigade of Gurkhas.

The images can be of any event relating to Gurkhas: Exercises, Training, Sport, Adventurous Training, Social, Portraits, Groups or Teams etc.

If you are supplying images taken on Operations, you may need to seek clearance from PJHQ. If unsure, send it to the POC’s email (detailed below) with enough time for the question to be asked to PJHQ. If the operation is in the past, a judgement call can be made in the office as to whether we can use that submission.

We will not accept collages – multiple images on one pasted together in software.

You may use software to enhance the photograph. Noting that simple is often the best.

Images can be portrait or landscape.

COPYRIGHT

You must have taken the image(s). You must have permission to take the image(s). If the images show children under the age of 16 you must have parental permission in place to take and use that image for this competition. Anyone found to be representing images as their own but they did not take them will face disciplinary actions and if raised as an issue by an outside agency legal action for copyright infringement.

SUBMISSION

You can send up to 3 images.

Cut of date for submissions is 31 May 2019. Any entry after this date will be ignored.

HQBG will retain all images for possible use on HQBG and or GBA outputs, digital or printed. No reference to the photographer will be made if the images are used post the competition

Application forms must be completed in full. The Application form is available on this webpage or this link.

PRIZES

The top prize will be worth approx. £150 (not cash) to be announced in due course.

Top six winning entries will appear in PARBATE, GBA website and social media.

They will be displayed at the Brigade of Gurkhas annual conference at Brigade Week and Brigade Bhela in July 19.

The winner will be invited to receive their prize from the Colonel Commandant Brigade of Gurkhas and or Colonel Brigade of Gurkhas.

Guidelines correct as at 19th February 2019, but are subject to change.

GUIDELINES PDF

Gurkha photographic 19 Competition Guidelines

APPLICATION FORM

Photography competition 19 application form

9 Platoon of Hamid Karzai International Airport (HKIA) Force Protection Company (Coy) have been deployed as part of the Force Protection Coy providing security for Aviation related advisory tasks in the Western element of HKIA. Mid-March saw 9 Pl make the transition from the role of the New Ministry of the Interior Affairs (NMOI) Force Protection Pl, which they had held for four months, into their new role, or so they thought…

Soon after the ‘Hand Over Take Over’ had been completed, 9 Platoon found themselves conducting their second day of Advisor Force Protection tasks when they received a threat warning for a complex and insider facilitated attack on the New Ministry of Interior. On receipt of this developing threat, HKIA Force Protection Coy were required to consolidate back in HKIA and prepare to support any Afghan-led Search Operation in order to prevent the attack reaching its Execution Phase. HKIA Coy faced a rapid turnaround to facilitate search assets checking the NMOI for any sign of hidden weapons or explosives. This included Ammunition and Explosive Search (AES) Dogs, and an Explosive Ordinance Disposal Team who deployed alongside a 9 Platoon Multiple.

9 Platoon also met with the Afghanistan search teams at the NMOI and provided a detailed ground brief to their commander. The Platoons detailed understanding of the site allowed the Afghan National Defence and Security Services to shape their Concept of Operations and searches were soon underway. The Search Operation saw the Platoon and an Afghan Squadron fluidly clearing the Auditorium, employing the AES Dogs to search for hidden explosives and providing a cordon to prevent the ingress of civilians and NMOI personnel. Once the Auditorium was secured and cleared, the Afghan National Defence Security Forces (ANDSF) evacuated the entire complex and systematically searched each individual.

Concurrently, the Search Group undertook a methodical search of over ten large, multi-storey office buildings, with the intent to identify lethal aid that had been stored in preparation for the attack. During the search, we were able to identify a series of known and unknown weapon locations, pass the information to the Afghan Commander and verify the legality of the weapons. Thankfully all the weapons that were found within the complex were registered, but it did provide an insight into how an attack could be facilitated and where HKIA Coy could add value to the security of the NMOI.

The Search proved to be a great experience for us, conducting an Operation in direct support of Afghan Forces and using assets that are not normally available to us. It was an opportunity to compliment our Afghan partners’ skills with sound intelligence from our own experiences within the site.

The Afghans were extremely cooperative, a pleasure to work with and were a great example of the tactical progression that the ANDSF have undergone in recent years. In addition, it was a welcome surprise to see a familiar face from Sandhurst leading one of the Afghan teams, highlighting the benefits of training alongside our partners in Defence.

In the early afternoon of the 27th February 2019, Gurkha BATUK went to visit Laikipia Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre in Nanyuki, known locally as the Centre for Extremely Deprived Children (CEDC).

When we arrived we were introduced to six members of staff, who in turn introduced us to 45 of the accommodated children. As part of our introduction, we gave a small presentation to the staff and children, including a short history of the Gurkhas, where we come from, and how we’ve come to join the British Army. We were then able to mingle with the children who asked us many more questions about our culture and traditions.

We spoke with Centre staff about the children’s accommodation, feeding and education. The centre is funded by the Kenyan Government, but it relies heavily on other contributions to ensure a basic standard of life for its inhabitants. Kenyan, Gem Dennis, has been the lead in coordinating fundraising for the CEDC over many years. He does this with donations from local businesses and authorities, and charity events and collections that lean on the kindness of the local population and beyond. He also helps each of the children in assisting them with their sporting endeavours, academics, and with the specifics off their personal situations.

Throughout the rest of the afternoon, we enjoyed playing sports with the children including football and rugby, we were then introduced to some local dancing and we all had a go.  Concurrently, the Gurkha Curry was being prepared in the garden, under the keen supervision of some of the children. The kids were so excited at how the Curry was cooked; everyone was surrounding us looking at our every single movement. However, they were so well behaved, reacting to every command that came from the staff; so loyal. They were really happy to help, collecting fire wood, bringing water from the tap; it was so exciting for them and us.

By 1700hrs, the food was ready, and we took some photographs with the children and presented them with a TV and a rugby ball, before sitting down to the traditional Gurkha Curry. The kids loved it, which made our visit worthwhile. Doing something from the bottom of our hearts is precious and remarkable in life.  

By Corporal Abinash Limbu, 2 Royal Gurkha Rifles, British Army Training Unit Kenya (BATUK).

Corporal Puspa Gurung Queen’s Gurkha Signals was presented his Long Service and Good Conduct Medal at the Headquarters Brigade of Gurkhas by Major General JJ Cole OBE, Commander Queen’s Gurkha Signals.

Born in the western part of Nepal, Corporal Puspa enlisted into the Brigade of Gurkhas in 24th December 2003.

On completion of basic trade training as an Area Systems Operator, he was posted to 2 Signal Regiment in 2005. Till date, he has served with 18, 22 and 30 Signal Regiments, Nepal Signal Troop and is currently serving at Headquarters Brigade of Gurkhas as a Media NCO.

During his career, he has deployed on Operation HERRICK 7, Operation KIRKDALE, Operation ELLAMY and various exercises in Kenya, Cyprus, Nepal and UK providing CIS services, Command Tac CIS and Close Support Security.

In 2015, he was serving at Nepal Signal Troop when Nepal faced a catastrophic natural disaster.  He was the focal point to an immediate Primary Communication back to UK and setting up Ops Room with BGAN voice and data services, providing CIS support to the staff officers and working with the British Embassy for the evacuation and safety of all soldiers, families, British citizens and LECs. He was also deployed with the British Embassy Rapid Response Team to Nuwakot Army Base Camp providing Communication Support and distribution of aid and assistance to the earthquake victims.

For 15 years of loyal and unblemished service, Corporal Puspa Gurung is awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct medal.

Queen’s Gurkha Engineers (QGE) families and their dependants returned home after a productive educational day trip in London.
Ably supported by the Brigade Education and Welfare Grant.
They watched and learnt about the Queen’s Guard by our very own QGE Public Duties Company, Changing of the Queen’s Guard at the Forecourt of Buckingham Palace, Friary Court of St James’s Palace as well as the Tower of London, where the Ceremony of The Keys takes place. They explored the fortress, prison, Royal Mint, and The Crown Jewels.

A group from the British Army has been touring India’s North-East paying homage to the fallen soldiers of the battles of Kohima and Imphal. 

 

Dubbed “the forgotten battles”, the victories of Kohima and Imphal are widely believed to have turned the tide of the war in the east.
 
Gurkha Captain Genendra Rai is seen here reading the roll of honour for fallen Gurkha soldiers at the Imphal War Cemetery on Sunday 7th April 2019.
 
Captain Rai was a member of a delegation which has been paying homage to war dead on the 75th Anniversary of the Kohima and Imphal battles.

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